Wednesday Reading List: Bill to Bar Illegal Immigrants From Ga. Public Colleges Sparks Debate

  • A bill that would bar illegal immigrants from attending public Georgia colleges and universities generated heated debate and lawmakers deferred a vote. (AJC)
  • Women outnumber men by a three to two ratio at historically black colleges and universities. (AJC)
  • Black women also significantly outnumber black men in the University System of Georgia, and schools are working to recruit, retain and graduate more male students. (AJC)
  • Former D.C. schools chancellor Michelle Rhee’s education reform group is lobbying for school choice and changing tenure laws in Alabama. (Birmingham News)
  • East Tennessee teachers are expressing mixed feelings about the state’s new evaluation system. (Knoxville News Sentinel)
  • Lobbying is intensifying around a pro-charter school state constitutional amendment in Georgia that could see its first vote this week. (AJC)
  • Mississippi’s school chief is asking for $305 million more dollars in education funds but acknowledged that lawmakers were unlikely to find the money. (AP via Laurel Leader-Call)
  • Few students take advantage of free tutoring schools must offer under No Child Left Behind. (Augusta Chronicle)
  • A plan to ease overcrowding in Jefferson Parish, La., could force hundreds of student transfers and the creation of the city’s first K-8 school. (Times-Picayune)
  • Tennessee’s largest teachers union is arguing that Gov. Bill Haslam’s education plans could mean the loss of 8,000 teaching jobs. (News Channel 5)
  • Georgia lawmakers have introduced legislation that would change the formula designed to eliminate funding disparities between poor and affluent school districts. (AJC
  • Georgia Gov. Nathan Deal’s plan to fund reading coach fills a need, but skeptics wonder if it will go far enough. (AJC)